Amose Pease Stone family history

Amose Pease Stone

 Amos Pease Stone, (father of my great grandmother) Minerva Pease Stone (Shaw), was born March 18, 1815, in Canaan, Columbia County, New York, to Amos Sheldon Stone and Rachel Pease Stone. Amos married Amelia Bishop, the daughter of Azeriah Bishop and Content Blakeslee Bishop on March 30, 1838, in New Haven, Connecticut. His wife died on December 28, 1845, leaving Amos with two little daughters, Emily and Merab.

The little girls were given a new mother when Amos married Minerva Leontine Jones on February 1, 1846. She was the daughter of Merlin Jones and Roxanna Ives Jones. Minerva and her parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints March 3, 1844.

 Soon after the marriage of Amos and Minerva, they decided to move west with the exodus of the Latter-day Saints. They bade farewell to their parents on March 20, 1846, and left for the West, taking only one of his daughters - Emily, Two years later, Amos returned to Connecticut from Carterville, Iowa (west of Council Bluffs), to get his other daughter, Merah. Two children were born to Amos and Minerva while they lived in Council Bluffs: OliveAnn, April 1847, and Amos Ives Stone, September 1, 1849. The Stones and their four children left for Utah with the William Snow / Joseph Young Company on June 21, 1850. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in early October and made their home in Bountiful, Utah.

  Three more children were born while they lived in Bountiful before they moved farther north to Ogden. They were Minerva Pease Stone, November 29, 1851, and twins Merlin Jones Stone and Cordelia Hotchkiss Stone, May 21, 1856. (Cordelia died February 15, 1858.) Their other three children were born in Ogden: Sylvia, July 11, 1859; Friend Ives, January, 1862; and Vincy Rice, January January 16th 1864.

 

 Amos Pease Stone Amos Pease Stone, father of Minerva, was born March 18, 1815, in Canaan, Columbia County, New York, to Amos Sheldon Stone and Rachel Pease Stone. Amos married Amelia Bishop, the daughter of Azeriah Bishop and Content Blakeslee Bishop on March 30, 1838, in New Haven, Connecticut. His wife died on December 28, 1845, leaving Amos with two little daughters, Emily and Merab.

 The little girls were given a new mother when Amos married Minerva Leontine Jones on February 1, 1846. She was the daughter of Merlin Jones and Roxanna Ives Jones. Minerva and her parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints March 3, 1844. Soon after the marriage of Amos and Minerva, they decided to move west with the exodus of the Latter-day Saints. They bade farewell to their parents on March 20, 1846, and left for the West, taking only one of his daughters Emily. Two years later Amos returned to Connecticut, Carterville Iowa (west of Council Bluffs), to get his other daughter, Merah. Two children were born to Amos and Minerva while they lived in Council Bluffs: OliveAnn, April 1847, and Amos Ives Stone, September 1, 1849.

 The Stones and their four children left for Utah with the William Snow/Joseph Young Company on June 21, 1850. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in early October and made their home in Bountiful, Utah. Three more children were born while they lived in Bountiful before they moved farther north to Ogden. They were Minerva Pease Stone, November 29, 1851, and twins Merlin Jones Stone and Cordelia Hotchkiss Stone, May 21, 1856. (Cordelia died February 15, 1858.) Their other three children were born in Ogden: Sylvia, July 11, 1859; Friend Ives, January, 1862; and Vincy Rice, January January 16th 1864. Many artifacts in the Weber County DUP Museum were owned by the family of James Brown including the following: sugar bowl with red pectoral design and an earthenware pitcher with lavender design located in the china cupboard by the stairs; handmade plow used at Brown's Fort; gambrel (hanger for butchering animals); cupboard of open shelves and a table.

MILES GOODYEAR CABIN

Miles Goodyear Cabin.

 The cabin was erected in 1845, two years prior to the entrance of the Mormon pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley. It is the first permanent home built in Utah by a white man and was constructed by Miles Goodyear on what is known today as 28th Street and the Weber River. The area was the site of Fort Buenaventura which means "good venture" or "achievement of goal." While Goodyear was away on his many trapping and trading ventures, a man named Wells cared for the fort and livestock. The site also contained a garden that was irrigated by caring water in buckets from the Weber River. The cabin was moved from Fort Buenaventura to Brown's Fort When the Mormon pioneers arrived in 1847, Goodyear began to feel Civilization closing in on him Negotiations was conducted for the sale of the fort and property. Captain James Brown had returned from California where he collected money for the services of some of the Mormon Battalion members Part of this money was used to purchase the Goodyear property. In addition to the fort, Goodyear claimed that he owned a "Mexican land grant" for property which today is about one half of Weber County. No proof has ever been found to support his claim. The deal was completed in November 1847.

 Brown and his family lived in the cabin only until 1850. Because of the Weber River oved1oing its banks, Brown moved the cabin about a quarter of a mile to the southeast. It was then called Brown's Fort. According to the biography of Minerva Pease Stone Shaw, "one cabin was later moved to Tabernacle Square." In 1857 Amos Pease Stone purchased the cabin from Captain Brown and used it as a blacksmith shop. In 1860 Stone moved the cabin to Mill Creek where the old Phoenix Mills later stood and which is now on the east side of Washington Boulevard between 14th and l5th streets. In 1866 it was moved to 1342 Washington Boulevard. When Stone died in 1890, it became the possession of his widow, Sarah. Her daughter, Minerva Pease Stone Shaw, purchased the cabin from Sarah's estate in 1896 and moved it to her residence at 1265 Washington where it remained until 1916. Concerned about the cabin's deterioration. Mrs. Shaw, in the 1920s, gave the cabin to Ogden City. The city moved the cabin again, this time to the lot in the rear of the fire Station on 9th Street and Washington. Minerva prized the cabin highly as a relic and desired that the Daughters of Utah Pioneers might possess it and preserve it. Ogden City commissioners returned the cabin to Mrs. Shaw who, in turn, presented it to the DUP on November 8, 1926. Two years later it was moved to its present site on the southwest Corner of the Ogden Tabernacle Square. Now known as the Ogden temple Square. The Daughters remodeled it by replacing decayed ground-level logs with new ones and replacing the old dirt roof with a shingled roof.

 As part of the Pioneer Day celebrations in July 1934, the Utah Pioneer Trails and Landmarks Association dedicated a granite marker and bronze tablet next to the Goodyear cabin. LDS Apostle George Albert Smith, in his capacity as president of the association, acted as master of ceremonies. Presiding at this event was Dora P. Holther, a former president of the Weber County Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Minerva Shaw, age eighty- three, attended the ceremonies and was honored as largely responsible for sang the cabin for posterity. Minerva's granddaughter. Elizabeth Dee Shaw Stewart, unveiled the stone monument and plaque. In 1970 the cabin was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Once accepted, it became eligible for protection under the 1966 Historic Preservation Act passed by Congress.

 In 1986 the descendants of Captain James Brown donated two pieces of furniture which had been in the Brown family. The pieces are said to be original to the cabin-a small cupboard and a drop-leaf kitchen table. In 2007, a baby cradle belonging to the Brown family was donated and is also on display in the cabin. In 1994 the cabin was dismantled and reconstructed to face the west. A sod roof was put in place at that time to more accurately replicate the original roof. Elizabeth Shaw Stewart, granddaughter of Minerva Stone Shaw, states, "It stands as a monument to a devoted pioneer who wanted to keep in mind the early life of those who made this northern empire possible for those who would follow."

 Minerva Pease Stone Shaw The last owner of the Goodyear cabin Minerva Pease Stone Shaw, was born November 29, 1851, in Bountiful, Utah, a daughter of Amos Pease Stone and Minerva Leontine Jones Stone. Her parents arrived in Utah on September 3, 1850, from Connecticut and they made their home in Sessions Settlement (Bountiful) until March 25, 1857 when they moved to Ogden where they spent the remainder of their lives. Amos Pease Stone was a blacksmith by trade. At first the Stone family lived with Minerva's great-grandparents, Merlin Jones and Roxanna Ives Jones Amos later built a home for his family at what is now 21st Street and Grant Avenue. He constructed an irrigation ditch from the Ogden River to water his garden plot and property. The family consisted of the parent's (Amos and Minerva), two daughters (Emily and Merab) from Amos's first marriage to Amelia Bishop, and eight children from the second marriage: Olive Ann, Amos Ives, Minerva Pease, Merlin Jones, Cordelia Hotehkiss, Sylvia, Friend, and Vincy Rice.

 Minerva Pease Stone (Shaw) attended school for about three months in the winter and three months in the summer. With no grading system, this did not seem to present a problem. She always remembered her teachers. She had an aptitude for spelling and participated with willingness in the local spelling bees between the area schools. There was a small school on l2 Street just West of Washington, another on Washington near what is now 16th Street, and an adobe Structure first owned by John Shaw, the father of Ambrose Shaw.

 Young Minerva was a girl who did not relish the inside work of the home, preferring to be outside and loving the beauties of nature and being close to her father. Throughout her life she wrote poetry about the beauty in the world around her. She was given the job of herding the sheep to their grazing grounds. She would pick pieces of their wool which snagged on the low bushes and take them home to be washed, carded, spun, and woven with other wool into clothing for the family. She remembered running barefoot on cocklebur-lined paths to gather Stray sheep and caring for the motherless lambs. She gathered wood and the tall, strong, abundant sunflower stalks for fuel. She often called herself the family chore boy.

 She was adept at making straw braid for hats. She churned butter and sometimes carried the heavy wooden churn two miles to her grand parents home where she would make flutter, then carry the churn hack to her home. She was also assigned to carry the family's water from the Ogden River. She related how she once encountered an Indian on her way home. Although stopped in her tracks, she managed to keep her wits about her, offering him a drink from her bucket, He drank, returned the bucket to her, and then disappeared.

 Minerva's first dance was held at school. She was very shy and afraid to ask anyone to dance. Her teacher led her by the hand to a group of boys and asked one of them to please dance with Minerva. They were both barefoot, and it was a never forgotten experience.

 When her mother became ill, Minerva assumed the responsibility for her care and the care other smaller brothers and sisters. When her mother died, sixteen-year-old Minerva continued with the household duties. This left little time for other pastimes. Sometime later, her father's health failed, and Minerva was forced to seek employment outside the home to ease the family's financial burden. She hired out to help in homes which eventually led her into the hone of Ambrose Shaw. His wife, Pamelia Dunn Shaw, had been ill for some time, and Minerva was to attend and care for her. Pamelia died on March 21 1871. Minerva stayed on as housekeeper, earning one dollar and fifty cents per week.

 On January 1, 1875, Minerva Pease Stone and Ambrose Shaw were married. She was twenty-three years of age, and he was fifty one. They became parents of six children: Ambrose Amos, Ernest, Eva Pamelia, Cordelia Minerva, Merlin, and Olive Theresa. Little Cordelia Minerva died of typhoid fever in October 1883. In March of 1886, six-year-old Eva Pamelia, as well as a relative living with them (Naomi Jones), died in a tragic fire at their home. Minerva was able to rescue the other four children from the fire in the process, she was severely burned and suffered from the effects for many years. To aid in her recovery, Minerva enrolled in a physical culture course. She studied under the tutelage of the Hoover School of Physical Culture headquartered in San Francisco. She completed the course, received a diploma, and later taught the course to others.

 To further aid in the recovery of her hands which were burned in the fire, her husband purchased a violin for her, which Minerva learned to play. She became well known for her music and was frequently asked to play for entertainment and dances. She would sometimes dance the old pioneer dance steps while playing her violin. She also played the accordion.

 Her husband built her a brick home on the corner of 13th Street and Washington. It was set back in the yard, leaving a great space in front. She had always wanted a pretty lawn and worked hard to realize this dream. After her death, the home and property were sold, and a motel was built there.

 Minerva related many stories of pioneer life in Ogden. She remembered the area near the Ogden River which was heavily lined with brush and contained many wild animals. There was an abundance of trout in the river along with ducks and other wild fowl. She often gathered box elder tree roots along the river bank to use as hoop for their fancy dresses.

A pioneer home was not complete without the old dye tub. Dyes were made from numerous roots, berries, bark, and whatever was at hand to use for coloring their cloth. Colors were set by using copperas, blue vitriol, or alum. Soap was scarce, so scraps of fat were saved from butchering beef or pork and used with leach or lye to make soap. The leach was made by running cold water through wood ashes. Her family lived in a fine two-story home (one room up and one room down) which her father had built. One window was on the east, and the door was on the West and made of heavy slab of wood held together with nails made by her blacksmith father from bits of scrap iron.

 Minerva's husband Ambrose was not a member of the LDS Church, and she had not been active for many years. As her husband's health failed, she began to worry that he was not a member. In January of 1905, through her efforts, he was baptized. They Went to the temple on September 13, 1905. He died shortly thereafter on January 19, 1906.

 In March of 1907, after her family were all raised and married. She had the opportunity to act as chaperon for a young woman whose father was being released as a mission president in England. They toured England and the continent, visiting many historical sites in France. Italy, Switzerland. Germany, Belgium, and Holland Four years after this memorable trip, she moved to Inkom, Idaho, to homestead one hundred sixty acres of land. She had a small log cabin built and lived there mostly alone for nine months of the year. She used a horse and buggy for transportation and raised grain, garden produce, chickens, and pigs. She gained title to the land as well as water rights.

 One of Minerva's great interests in later life was the gathering of relics, and approximately seventy of them are housed in the Weber County DUP Museum in Ogden. Much time was spent and many miles were traveled to find items significant to pioneer history for display in the museum her son, Ambrose Amos. Would often take her to pick up her finds. She also helped in the gathering of many of the old pioneer songs for the DUP song book.

 Probably her greatest, and accomplishment came from the old Goodyear cabin, now located next to the museum. At one time, in 1934 or 1935, she was interviewed by Harold H. Jenson, a Church historian. He wrote an article which was published in a local newspaper regarding the history of the log cabin in which she took so much pride. One day in July 1936, she went for a ride with a daughter and daughter-in- law. They drove up the canyon, parked the automobile, and hiked a short way up the mountain. Minerva was able to go faster and farther than either of the two younger women. A few days later, while watering her front yard, she turned her ankle, fell and broke her hip. She died on July 21st, 1936, at the age of eighty-five, the end of a long, eventful, and fruitful life.